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Calcified Tissue Research

, Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 157–162 | Cite as

Estrogen-induced sequential changes in avian bone metabolism

  • Russel T. Turner
  • Harold Schraer
Article

Summary

Medullary bone was induced in male Japanese quail by administration of estradiol valerate. An increase in the organic weight of the femur was observed by 36 h after estrogen and an increase in ash weight was observed by 96 h. A complex sequence of metabolic changes in the femur occurred after estrogen treatment. A large increase in uptake of3H-proline associated with enhanced collagen formation began 36 h after estrogen and reached a peak 3.5 times the control rate at 60 h. The onset of mineralization of the newly formed bone matrix, as determined by45Ca uptake, began about 24 h after onset of collagen synthesis indicating that synthesis of the bone matrix and its mineralization occur sequentially. Large increases in the rates of uptake of3H-uridine and3H-thymidine occurred prior to the onset of medullary bone formation and appear to reflect the differentiation of osteogenic precursors to bone-forming cells.

Key words

Estrogen and bone metabolism Medullary bone Osteogenesis Japanese quail 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Russel T. Turner
    • 1
  • Harold Schraer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and BiophysicsThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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