Sexual Plant Reproduction

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 186–188 | Cite as

Identification of genes expressed in the shoot apex ofBrassica campestris during floral transition

  • Hiroyasu Kitashiba
  • Takayoshi Iwai
  • Kinya Toriyama
  • Masao Watanabe
  • Kokichi Hinata
Sequence Update

Abstract

The vegetative-to-floral transition ofBrassica campestris cv. Osome was induced by vernalization. Poly(A)+RNA was isolated from the transition shoot apex after 6 weeks of vernalization, the floral apex after 12 weeks of vernalization and the expanded leaves just before vernalization, and cDNAs were synthesized. These cDNAs were used for subtraction and differential screening to select cDNA preferentially present in the transition and floral apices. Nucleotide sequences of the resulting 14 cDNA clones were determined, and northern blot analysis was carried out on six cDNAs. Two cDNA clones which did not show significant similarity to known genes were shown to be preferentially expressed in the floral apex.

Key words

Brassica campestris cDNA cloning Floral transition Shoot apex Vernalization 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroyasu Kitashiba
    • 1
  • Takayoshi Iwai
    • 2
  • Kinya Toriyama
    • 1
  • Masao Watanabe
    • 1
  • Kokichi Hinata
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Plant Breeding, Faculty of AgricultureTohoku UniversityAobaku, SendaiJapan
  2. 2.Miyagi Prefecture Agricultural Research CenterMiyagiJapan

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