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Journal of World Prehistory

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 237–268 | Cite as

Advances in the paleopathology of Andean South America

  • John W. Verano
Article

Abstract

Over the past 100 years, paleopathology has grown from the occasional description of the odd and curious to what is today a dynamic and multidisciplinary field. South American skeletal and mummified remains played a key role in stimulating the development of the discipline in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The past 20 years have witnessed a renewed interest in the paleopathology of prehistoric Andean populations. Recent studies are characterized by growing sophistication in both research methods and theory, and significant advances have been made in understanding diet, disease, and general health patterns in the prehistoric Andean world.

Key words

paleopathology skeletal biology Andean area mummies 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Verano
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyTulane UniversityNew Orleans

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