Some patterns of herbicide and growth regulator intake, persistence, and distribution in sugarcane

  • H. Wayne Hilton
  • Norman S. Nomura
  • Sandra S. Kameda
  • William L. Yauger
Article

Abstract

Absorption of14C-labeled herbicides from nutrient culture solution through the roots of sugarcane plants (Saccharum spp. hybrids) resulted in three major types of distribution. Labeled residues from atrazine, ametryne, and metribuzin moved easily through the xylem to the green leaves and were deposited mainly at the leaf margins and tip. Senescence and leaf abscission removed most of the deposit from the plant. Picloram translocated rapidly into the leaves, but appeared to recycle from older to younger leaves with only small portions remaining in the senescent leaves. Asulam and pentachlorophenol (PCP) were absorbed by the roots; residues did not pass into the xylem and remained fixed in the roots.

Foliar additions of labeled herbicides and growth regulators generally showed only minor absorption and translocation within the leaf. Weathering processes and volatility during a 6- to 12-week period left variable amounts of residue, characteristic of individual compounds, adsorbed at the treated sites.

Keywords

Growth Regulator Sugarcane Volatility Atrazine Saccharum 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Wayne Hilton
    • 1
  • Norman S. Nomura
    • 1
  • Sandra S. Kameda
    • 1
  • William L. Yauger
    • 1
  1. 1.Experiment StationHawaiian Sugar Planters' AssociationHonoluluUSA

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