Human subject experiments to estimate reentry periods for monocrotophos-treated tobacco

  • F. E. Guthrie
  • J. J. Domanski
  • A. L. Chasson
  • D. E. Bradway
  • R. J. Monroe
Article

Abstract

Thirteen to fifteen human volunteers worked for eight-hr periods in tobacco fields treated 96, 72, and 48 hr previously with monocrotophos (3-hydroxy-N-methyl-cis-crotonamide dimethyl phosphate). At the 48-hr reentry period, during which time no rainfall occurred, both post-exposure plasma and red blood cell cholinesterase levels of the worker group were depressed from pre-exposure levels although the decline was less than 9% in both cases. Rainfall in excess of one inch fell during the 96- and 72-hr reentry intervals, and no important change in cholinesterase levels was noted. Experiments with mice were in general agreement with the human tests. Dimethyl phosphoric acid in urine of the worker group collected prior to, and three hr after, exposure was unchanged in all cases. Rain appeared to have markedly reduced dislodgable residues.

Keywords

Dimethyl Work Group Phosphoric Acid Cholinesterase Important Change 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. E. Guthrie
    • 1
  • J. J. Domanski
    • 1
  • A. L. Chasson
    • 2
    • 3
  • D. E. Bradway
    • 3
  • R. J. Monroe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EntomologyNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleigh
  2. 2.Rex HospitalRaleigh
  3. 3.Environmental Protection AgencyResearch Triangle

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