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Measurement and prediction of the disappearance rates from soil of 6-chloropicolinic acid

  • R. W. Meikle
  • C. R. Youngson
  • R. T. Hedlund
  • C. A. I. Goring
  • W. W. Addington
Article

Abstract

6-Chloropicolinic acid is the sole detectable metabolite, other than carbon dioxide, arising from decomposition of 2-chloro-6-(trichloromethyl) pyridine in soil. The pyridine compound is a potent inhibitor of nitrification now in use with ammonium fertilizers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative influence of various soil and climatic factors on rates of degradation of 6-chloropicolinic acid in soil.

Experiments with a wide range of soil types (23 soils) demonstrate that the most important factor influencing the decomposition rate of 6-chloropicolinic acid is soil temperature. When temperature is not a variable, the quantity of organic matter (0.9 to 6.9% by weight) and pH (4.8 to 8.1) significantly affect the rate of decomposition, but sand, silt, and clay percentages do not. Moisture content was without apparent effect because the range of values investigated was too narrow.

A fractional-order rate law (0.7) describes the disappearance rate best.

Application of the Arrhenius equation to the data for the decomposition of 6-chloropicolinic acid in soil indicates an activation energy of 6.57 kcal per mole, suggesting that the chemical is biologically rather than chemically degraded.

It was not possible to develop a suitably precise equation for prediction of loss rate as affected by the above soil and climatic factors because undefined biological factors in the soils override the effect of measurable properties of soil and climate.

Keywords

Clay Activation Energy Pyridine Silt Soil Temperature 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. W. Meikle
    • 1
  • C. R. Youngson
    • 1
  • R. T. Hedlund
    • 1
  • C. A. I. Goring
    • 1
  • W. W. Addington
    • 1
  1. 1.Dow Chemical U.S.A.Ag-Organics Research LaboratoriesWalnut Creek

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