Advertisement

Epidemiological findings and evaluation of the amount of organochlorine pesticides in human blood plasma in Japan

  • Seiya Yamaguchi
  • Shunsuke Kaku
  • Yoshiro Kuwahara
  • Akira Yamada
Article

Abstract

Epidemiological and experimental studies were carried out in order to evaluate the significance of the amount of organochlorine pesticides in biological specimens.

The amount ofβ-BHC, DDT and DDE was determined and compared in human plasma samples taken from several different socio-economic groups. The residue pesticides thus determined reflected the difference in the amount of pesticides used for agricultural purposes in respective areas. The highest value ofβ-BHC was found among the people of some groups who had taken more fat-rich animal proteins than the people in other groups.

It was also noteworthy that the amount ofβ-BHC has decreased in the females in the population who have experienced pregnancy more than one time. The animal experiment also showed the effect of pregnancy on the elimination or decomposition of the pesticides in the biological milieu.

Keywords

Japan Experimental Study Animal Experiment Plasma Sample Human Plasma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Curley, A., and R. Kimbrough,: Chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides in plasma and milk of pregnant and lactating women. Arch. Environ. Health18, 156 (1969).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Davies, J. E.: Pesticides residues in man. In C. A. Edwards (ed.): Environmental Pollution by Pesticides, pp 313–333, Plenum Press, London and New York (1973).Google Scholar
  3. Hayashi, M.: Contamination of human milk by pesticedes. J. Japan Medical Asso.68, 1281 (1972).Google Scholar
  4. Juszkewicz, T., and J. Stec: Residues of chlorinated hydrocarbon iusecticides in adipose tissue of peasants from the province of Lublin: Cited from Excerpta. Medica2, 99. Excerpta Medica Foundation, Amsterdam (1972).Google Scholar
  5. Kaku, S.: Unpublished data.Google Scholar
  6. Kaku, S., and Y. Kuwahara: Unpublished data.Google Scholar
  7. Kuwahara, Y.: Unpublished data.Google Scholar
  8. Kasai, R., T. Nakamura, and H. Ide: Proceedings, Japan Congress of Rural Medicine, Tokyo, (1972).Google Scholar
  9. Laws, E. R., A. Curley, and F. J. Birons: Men with intensive occupational exposure to DDT, A clinical and chemical study, Arch. Environ. Health15, 766 (1967).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Nishimoto, T., and M. Ueda: Deposit of organochlorine pesticides in human fat tissue. Igaku no Ayumi.73, 275 (1970).Google Scholar
  11. Rosival, L., A. Szokolay, F. Gorner, A. Madaric, and J. Uhuals: Proceedings, 4th. International Congress of Rural Medicine, Tokyo, (1972).Google Scholar
  12. Tachikawa, R., T. Wakimoto, and T. Ogawa,: Environmental pollution by BHC pesticides. J. Food Hygiene11, (1970).Google Scholar
  13. Tatsumi, M., A. Sugaya; A. and S. Sasaki: Proceedings, Japan Congress of Rural Medicine, Tokyo, (1972).Google Scholar
  14. Ueda, K.: Environmental pollution by pesticides. Japanese J. Medical Ass.65, (1971).Google Scholar
  15. Watson, M., W. W. Benson, and J. Gabica: Serum organochlorine pesticides levels in people in southern Idaho. Pest. Monit. J.,4, 47 (1970).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seiya Yamaguchi
    • 1
  • Shunsuke Kaku
    • 1
  • Yoshiro Kuwahara
    • 1
  • Akira Yamada
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Public Health, Faculty of MedicineKurume UniversityFukuokaJapan

Personalised recommendations