Advertisement

Influence of humidity and rain on uptake and metabolism of14C-azinphos-methyl in bean plants

  • W. Steffens
  • J. Wieneke
Article

Abstract

In several experiments the influence of relative humidity and rain on uptake and metabolism of carbonyl-14C-azinphos-methyl was examined in bean plants under the following environmental conditions: Growth room with 35/80%, 65/85% and 95/95% (day/night) relative humidity and open field with and without rain. Increasing relative humidity had an enhancing effect on the rate of uptake and metabolism. A higher portion of water-soluble compounds was found in the bean tissue, although the azinphos-methyl itself is relatively non-polar. Low relative humidity and possible dry periods in summer will reduce the uptake and will leave the azinphos-methyl relatively persistent on the leaf surface. Rain or spray irrigation easily removed azinphos-methyl from the leaves. The rate of this removal seemed to depend on the intensity and time of rainfall after application. However, repeated wettings by rain may simultaneously stimulate uptake and metabolism of azinphos-methyl by the leaves.

Keywords

Relative Humidity Open Field Leaf Surface Enhance Effect Bean Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Crosby, D. G.: Experimental approaches to pesticide photodecomposition. Residue Reviews25, 1 (1969).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Crosby, D. G.: The fate of pesticides in the environment. Ann. Rev. Plant. Physiol.24, 467 (1973).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Hull, H. G.: Leaf structure as related to absorption of pesticides and other compounds. Residue Reviews31, 1 (1970).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Liang, T. T., and E. P. Lichtenstein: Effect of light, temperature, and pH on the degradation of azinphos-methyl. J. Econ. Entomol.65, 315 (1972).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Plimmer, J. R.: Principles of photodecomposition of pesticides. Degradation of synthetic organic molecules in the biosphere. ISBN 0-309-02046-8. Nat. Acad. Sci. Washington, D. C., 279 (1970).Google Scholar
  6. Schulz, K. R., E. P. Lichtenstein, T. T. Liang, and T. W. Fuhrmann: Persistence and degradation of azinphos-methyl in soils, as affected by formulation and mode of application. J. Econ. Entomol.63, 432 (1970).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Steffens, W., and J. Wieneke: Untersuchungen zu Aufnahme und Stoffwechsel von14C-markiertem Methyl- und Äthyl-Gusathion in Kulturpflanzen. I. Extraktion, Fraktionierung und14C-Bilanz. Pflanzenschutz-Nachrichten Bayer, accepted for publication (1974).Google Scholar
  8. Wieneke, J., and W. Steffens: Untersuchungen zu Aufnahme und Stoffwechsel von14C-markiertem Methyl- und Äthyl-Gusathion in Kulturpflanzen. II. Chromatographische Auftrennung und quantitative Bestimmung der Metaboliten und Schritte zu ihrer Identifizierung. Pflanzenschutz-Nachrichten Bayer, accepted for publication (1975).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Steffens
    • 1
  • J. Wieneke
    • 1
  1. 1.Arbeitsgruppe Radioagronomie der Kernforschungsanlage Julich GmbH517 JulichWest Germany

Personalised recommendations