Plant and Soil

, Volume 116, Issue 2, pp 207–215 | Cite as

The selective allelopathic interaction of a pasture-forest intercropping in Taiwan

II. Interaction between kikuyu grass and three hardwood plants
  • Chang-Hung Chou
  • Sun-Jung Chang
  • Ching-Ming Cheng
  • Yeong-Chyn Wang
  • Fu-Hsing Hsu
  • Wei-Hsiung Den
Article

Abstract

An allelopathic interaction of a pasture-forest intercropping system was evaluated by field and greenhouse experiments and by laboratory assays. A study site was situated in the farm of Hoshe Forestry Experiment Station at Nantou County, Taiwan. After deforestation of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata), a split plot design of 8 treatments was set up: open ground without planting as control, planted with kikuyu grass, planted with kikuyu grass andAlnus formosana, planted with kikuyu grass andZelkova formosana, planted with kikuyu grass andCinnamomum camphora, planted withA. formosana, planted withZ. formosana, and planted withC. camphora. Field measurements showed that weeds grew luxuriantly six months after treatment in plots which had not been planted with kikuyu grass. However, the growth of weeds was significantly retarded but that of woody plants was not affected when the plots were planted with kikuyu grass. As compared with the tap water control, the aqueous leachate of kikuyu grass stimulated the seedling growth ofC. camphora andA. formosana, but the extract stimulated the growth ofC. camphora and inhibited that ofA. formosana. In contrast, the aqueous extracts of three hardwood plants exhibited variable inhibition on the root initiation of kikuyu grass, and the extract ofZ. formosana revealed the highest phytotoxic effect. The aforementioned extracts and leachates were bioassayed against seed germination and radicle growth of four test plants, namely annual rye grass, perennial rye gras, tall fescue, and Chinese cabbage and against seedling growth ofMiscanthus floridulus. The extract ofZ. formosana revealed the highest phytotoxic effect on the test species while that of kikuyu grass showed the least effect. By means of paper chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography, phytotoxic phenolics were identified and the amount of phytotoxins present was highest in the extract ofZ. formosana but was lowest in that of kikuyu grass. The degree of phytotoxicity and amount of phytotoxins was in good correlation, indicating that a selective allelopathic effect was involved. The findings suggest that allelopathy may contribute benefits in the intercropping system to reduce the need for herbicides and to lessen the labour cost for weed control.

Key words

allelopathy Alnus formosana Cinnamomum camphora Zelkova formosana kikuyu grass pasture-forest intercropping Pennisetum clandestinum phenolics phytotoxins 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chang-Hung Chou
    • 1
  • Sun-Jung Chang
    • 1
  • Ching-Ming Cheng
    • 1
  • Yeong-Chyn Wang
    • 2
  • Fu-Hsing Hsu
    • 2
  • Wei-Hsiung Den
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of BotanyAcademia SinicaTaipeiTaiwan, Republic of China
  2. 2.Taiwan Livestock Research InstituteTainanTaiwan
  3. 3.Hoshe Forestry Experiment StationNational Taiwan UniversityNantouTaiwan, Republic of China

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