Population and Environment

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 201–217 | Cite as

Toward sustainable development: Implications for population aging and the wellbeing of elderly women in developing countries

  • Jennifer C. Cornman
Article

Abstract

Attaining sustainable development has significant implications for population age structure, family structure and the wellbeing of elderly women. If one of the primary goals of sustainable development is reducing fertility to attain a population growth rate which can be supported by the Earth's resources, then working toward sustainable development will lead to an aging population. This demographic change coupled with other impacts of working toward sustainable development could significantly affect the status and wellbeing of elderly women. Drawing on examples primarily from the Asian setting, this paper will examine population aging and what this demographic change may mean for elderly women in developing areas.

Keywords

Growth Rate Sustainable Development Population Growth Population Aging Family Structure 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer C. Cornman
    • 1
  1. 1.Population Studies Center 1225 S. UniversityUniversity of MichiganAnn Arbor

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