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Population and Environment

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 111–141 | Cite as

Men, women, and sustainability

  • Bobbi S. Low
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© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bobbi S. Low
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Natural Resources and EnvironmentUniversity of MichiganAnn Arbor

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