Platelet serotonin, a possible marker for familial autism

  • Joseph Piven
  • Guochuan Tsai
  • Eileen Nehme
  • Joseph T. Coyle
  • Gary A. Chase
  • Susan E. Folstein
Article

Abstract

Serotonin (5HT) levels in platelet-rich plasma were measured in 5 autistic subjects who had siblings with either autism or pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), 23 autistic subjects without affected siblings, and 10 normal controls. The 5HT levels of autistic subjects with affected siblings were significantly higher than probands without affected siblings, and autistic subjects without affected siblings had 5HT levels significantly higher than controls. Differences in 5HT levels remained significant after adjustment for sex, age, and IQ. These results suggest that 5HT level in autistic subjects may be associated with genetic liability to autism.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Piven
    • 1
  • Guochuan Tsai
    • 1
  • Eileen Nehme
    • 1
  • Joseph T. Coyle
    • 1
  • Gary A. Chase
    • 2
  • Susan E. Folstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineUSA
  2. 2.Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public HealthUSA

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