Geo-Marine Letters

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 108–114 | Cite as

Insights into deposition of Lower Cretaceous black shales from meager accumulation of organic matter in Albian sediments from ODP site 763, Exmouth Plateau, Northwest Australia

  • Philip A. Meyers
Article

Abstract

The amount and type of organic matter present in an exceptionally complete upper Aptian to lower Cenomanian sequence of sediments from ODP site 763 on the Exmouth Plateau has been determined. Organic carbon concentrations average 0.2%. Organic matter is marine in origin, and its production and preservation was low over the ca. 20-million-year interval recorded by this sequence. Because this section was tectonically isolated from mainland Australia in the early Aptian, it better represents global oceanic conditions than the many basin-edge locations in which Albian-age black shales have been found. Formation of the basin-edge black shales evidently resulted from rapid, turbiditic burial of organic matter rather than from enhanced oceanic production or from basin-wide anoxia during the Albian.

Keywords

Organic Matter Organic Carbon Shale Cretaceous Burial 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip A. Meyers
    • 1
  1. 1.Marine Geology and Geochemistry Program, Department of Geological SciencesThe University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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