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Mycopathologia et mycologia applicata

, Volume 52, Issue 3–4, pp 261–266 | Cite as

Physiological studies on Phymatotrichum omnivorum VI. Lipid composition of mycelium and sclerotia

  • M. Gunasekaran
  • D. J. Weber
Article

Abstract

The lipid composition of the mycelium and sclerotia ofPhymatotrichum omnivorum was compared. The lipids of the mycelium contained 47.9 % polar lipids as compared to 21.4 % in the sclerotia. Sterols represented 10 % of the lipids in sclerotia as contrasted to 3.6 % of the mycelium. More monoglycerides (17.5 %) were detected in the sclerotia as compared to the mycelium (1.6 %). Fatty acid analysis indicated that linoleic acid was the predominant fatty acid in the total fatty acids fraction in both the mycelium and the sclerotia. Palmitic acid was the major free fatty acid in the mycelium, whereas myristic acid was the predominant free fatty acid in the sclerotia. In the fatty acids of the diglycerides of sclerotia, palmitic acid represented 71 % of that fraction, as compared to 6.6 % of the fatty acids of the diglycerides in the mycelium. The major fatty acid in the diglycerides of the mycelium was oleic acid.

Keywords

Lipid Free Fatty Acid Linoleic Acid Oleic Acid Palmitic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dr. W. Junk B.V. 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Gunasekaran
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. J. Weber
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Botany & Range ScienceBrigham Young UniversityProvo
  2. 2.Rust CollegeHolly SpringsUSA

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