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Mycopathologia et mycologia applicata

, Volume 52, Issue 3–4, pp 191–196 | Cite as

Effect of temperature and sources of carbon and nitrogen on the conidial germination and appresoria formation in Colletotrichum capsici

  • J. S. Solanki
  • J. P. Jain
  • J. P. Agnihotri
Article

Abstract

The effect of temperatures and exogenous supply of different carbon and nitrogen sources on the conidial germination and appresoria formation inC. capsici has been studied. 25 °C was observed to be the best temperature for conidial germination. At 18 °C, conidia germinated only in hanging drops and did not germinate on 2 % agar. Amongst carbon sources, 1-rhamnose supported maximum conidial germination and appresoria formation. Potassium nitrate supported very good conidial germination and appresoria formation. Ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulphate and ammonium chloride were found to be inhibitory. A few aminoacids stimulated conidial germination but dl-alanine, dl-methionine, tyrosine and l-glutamine were found to be inhibitory.

Keywords

Nitrogen Ammonium Nitrate Potassium Agar 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dr. W. Junk B.V. 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. S. Solanki
  • J. P. Jain
  • J. P. Agnihotri
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Experiment StationUniversity of UdaipurJaipurIndia

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