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Plant and Soil

, Volume 91, Issue 3, pp 329–332 | Cite as

Alteration in enrichment of NO 3 and reduced-N in xylem exudate during and after extended plant exposure to15NO 3

  • Thomas W. RuftyJr.
  • Richard J. Volk
Article

Summary

Distinctly different patterns of15N enrichment were observed in the nitrate and reduced-N fractions of xylem exudate from soybean plants during and after 5 to 6 days of exposure to15NO 3 . Within 1 d after changes in solution NO 3 label, more than 90% of the exudate NO 3 originated from the exogenous supply. Alterations in the enrichment of exudate reduced-N were much slower, however, and the enrichment reached only 40% even after 5 d of continuous exposure to15NO 3 . Taking into account possible reduction of endogenous NO 3 and delayed translocation of NO 3 reduction products, it was concluded that root reduction could have contributed only 30 to 42% of the reduced-N found in the exudate.

Key words

Glycine max L. Nitrate Nitrate reduction Soybean Xylem exudate 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas W. RuftyJr.
    • 1
  • Richard J. Volk
    • 1
  1. 1.United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service and Departments of Crop Science and Soil ScienceNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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