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Plant and Soil

, Volume 109, Issue 1, pp 31–36 | Cite as

Effect of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium on spikelet sterility induced by low temperature at the reproductive stage of rice

  • M. Z. Haque
Article

Abstract

Spikelet sterility induced by low temperature at the reproductive stage of rice increased further with the increase of nitrogen supply. Spikelet sterility in Fujisaka-5 did not increase due to low temperature when nitrogen supply was increased from 10 to 40 ppm and at 80 ppm nitrogen supply it was less affected than IR36. Total nitrogen content in the leaves increased with the increase of nitrogen supply and was forced to be associated with the spikelet sterility induced by low temperature. Based on auricle distance between the last two leaves, the most sensitive stage to low temperature damage differed in Fujisaka-5 and IR36. Spikelet sterility induced by low temperature for 10 days was very high in both the varieties and the effect of nitrogen was not clear.

The effect of phosphorus on the spikelet sterility induced by low temperature at reproductive stage was not clear except that at the highest phosphorus (P) level (10 ppm) the spikelet sterility increased both in Fujisaka-5 and IR36.

Spikelet sterility induced by low temperature at the reproductive stage of rice decreased with the increase of Potassium (K) supply in both Fujisaka-5 and IR36. With an increase of potassium supply, nitrogen (N) content decreased in the leaves and panicles and spikelet sterility induced by low temperature decreased with an increase of the K to N ratio in the leaves and panicles. The results suggest that potassium might play a major role to counteract the low temperature damage at the reproductive stage of rice.

Key words

nitrogen phosphorus potassium rice low temperature reproductive stage flag leaf auricle distance spikelet sterility 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Z. Haque
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Physiology DepartmentThe International Rice Research InstituteLos Baños, LagunaPhilippines

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