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Plant Foods for Human Nutrition

, Volume 42, Issue 2, pp 175–182 | Cite as

Studies on the effect of dry Sundakai (solanum torvum) powder supplementation on lipid profile, glycated proteins and amino acids in non-insulin dependent diabetic patients

  • Uma M. Iyer
  • Nivedita C. Mehta
  • Indrani Mani
  • Uliyar V. Mani
Article

Abstract

The effect of dry Sundakai powder supplementation (7 g providing 1.23 g of crude fibre) on glycemic control, lipidemic control, total amino acids and uronic acid was studied on 30 non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients. All the patients were on hypoglycemic drugs. The above parameters were monitored at day 1, 15 and 30 days. After one month of fibre supplementation, no significant changes were observed with respect to glucose, lipid profile, glycated proteins, total amino acids and uronic acid levels in these subjects.

Key words

Diabetes mellitus dry Sundakai powder supplementation glucose lipid profile glycated proteins 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Uma M. Iyer
    • 1
  • Nivedita C. Mehta
    • 2
  • Indrani Mani
    • 1
  • Uliyar V. Mani
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Foods and NutritionM S University of BarodaBarodaIndia
  2. 2.Department of MedicineM S University of BorodaBarodaIndia

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