Biotherapy

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 21–29 | Cite as

Therapeutic and life-prolonging effect of intrapleural injection with a streptococcal preparation, OK-432, and IL2-cultured effusion lymphocytes to breast cancer patients with malignant pleural effusion

  • Taisuke Hori
  • Keiichi Mise
  • Norimichi Kan
  • Takashi Okino
  • Kohei Satoh
  • Seiji Yamasaki
  • Yasufumi Teramura
  • Takehisa Harada
  • Kazuhisa Ohgaki
  • Hiroshi Kodama
  • Takayoshi Tobe
Article

Abstract

We developed a local AIT using PEL cultured with TCGF combined with preadministration of OK-432. Twenty-six patients of breast cancer with pleural effusion have been treated with this therapy since 1983. PEL expanded and tumor cells collapsed by day 9 in culture with TCGF. Cultured PEL possessed significantly higher cytotoxic activity against autologous tumor cells than PBL cultured in the same condition (p < 0.05), but there was no difference between their cytotoxic activities against K562. The proliferation rate of PEL obtained after intrapleural administration of OK-432 was higher than that obtained before OK-432 (p < 0.01). Moreover, the cytotoxic activities against both autologous tumor and K562 of cultured PEL obtained after OK-432 administration was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those cultured PEL obtained before.

Cultured PEL (1 x 108 - 6 x 109) were transferred into the pleural cavity after the intrapleural administration of OK-432 (1–5 KE). The volume of pleural effusion increased temporarily after the administration of OK-432 but significantly (p < 0.01) decreased after AIT. Tumor cells disappeared cytologically in 22 patients at the last puncture of pleural effusion. Pleural effusion disappeared completely in 19 of 26 patients and decreased by more than 50% in volume in 6 patients. Performance status improved in 22 patients. The response rate for OK-432-combined AIT in the present study was 96%. The survival period of the patients treated by OK-432-combined AIT in this trial was significantly (p < 0.002) prolonged compared to that of the patients receiving chemotherapy alone. The side effects were fever and general malaise after OK-432 administration but no critical toxicity was observed.

Key words

adoptive immunotherapy breast cancer interleukin-2 pleural effusion tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes 

Abbreviations

AIT

adoptive immunotherapy

PEL

pleural effusion lymphocytes

TCGF

T cell growth factor

PBL

peripheral blood lymphocytes

TIL

tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes

IL-2

interleukin-2

LAK

lymphokine activated killer

HBSS

Hanks' balanced salt solution

T/L ratio

tumor cell/lymphoid cell ratio

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Taisuke Hori
    • 1
  • Keiichi Mise
    • 1
  • Norimichi Kan
    • 1
  • Takashi Okino
    • 1
  • Kohei Satoh
    • 1
  • Seiji Yamasaki
    • 1
  • Yasufumi Teramura
    • 1
  • Takehisa Harada
    • 1
  • Kazuhisa Ohgaki
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Kodama
    • 1
  • Takayoshi Tobe
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Oncologic Surgery, 1st Department of Surgery, School of MedicineKyoto UniversitySakyo-ku, KyotoJapan

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