Minerva

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 165–184 | Cite as

The developing pattern of Australian tertiary education: An analysis and critique of three reports

  • Alan Lindsay
Reports and Documents

Keywords

Tertiary Education Australian Tertiary Education 

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References

  1. 1.
    See O'Byrne, Garry and Lindsay, Alan W., “An Analysis of the Tertiary Education Commission's Case for a No-Growth Policy in Higher Education”,The Australian Quarterly, pp. (December 1978), pp. 10–29.Google Scholar
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    Ibid., O'Byrne, Garry and Lindsay, Alan W., “An Analysis of the Tertiary Education Commission's Case for a No-Growth Policy in Higher Education”,The Australian Quarterly, pp. (December 1978), 13–17; Tertiary Education Commission,Report for the 1982–84 Triennium (Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service, 1981), vol. 1, part 1, pp. 47–49.Google Scholar
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    The only comparable source of influence would be that of particular individuals in the education system such as Professor R. C. Mills in the 1940s and 1950s and Professor P. Karmel in the 1960s and 1970s, and in the government, such as Sir Robert Menzies, who was Prime Minister at the time of the Martin Report, Malcolm Fraser, Minister for Education and Science 1968 to 1969 and Prime Minister 1975 to the present, and Kim Beazley, Labour Minister for Education, 1972 to 1975.Google Scholar
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    Universities of course do research as well as teach and this distinguishes them from other educational institutions.Google Scholar
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    The members of the committee were: Professor B. R. Williams (chairman), vice-chancellor and principal, University of Sydney; Mr. M. H. Bone, immediate past director-general, Department of Further Education, South Australia; Mr. C. O. Dolan, national secretary, Electrical Trades Union of Australia, senior vice-president of the Australian Council of Trade Unions, a part-time commissioner of the Tertiary Education Commission and a member of the National Training Council; Dr. A. M. Fraser, director of the Queensland Institute of Technology, a member of the Advanced Education Council and a member of the Queensland Board of Advanced Education; Commissioner Pauline Griffin, Australian Conciliation and Arbitration Commission, and a former member of the Council of Abbotsleigh School, Sydney; Miss E. M. Guthrie, regional director of education, New South Wales Department of Education; Mr. J. A. L. Hooke, chairman, Amalgamated Wireless (Australasia) Ltd. and a member of the Defence (Industrial) Committee; Sir Peter Lloyd, former chairman, Cadbury Fry Pascall Australia Ltd. and a member of the council of the University of Tasmania; Dr. W. D. Neal, chairman, Western Australia Post-secondary Education Commission; Mr. D. R. Zeidler, chairman and managing director, ICI Australia Ltd., and a member of the Defence (Industrial) Committee.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Minerva 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Lindsay

There are no affiliations available

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