Sleep EEG of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder

  • Fritz Hohagen
  • Stephanie Lis
  • Stephan Krieger
  • Gaby Winkelmann
  • Dieter Riemann
  • Rosemarie Fritsch-Montero
  • Eibe Rey
  • Joseph Aldenhoff
  • Mathias Berger
Original Articles

Summary

Twenty-two patients suffering from an obsessive and compulsive disorder (OCD) according to DSM-III-R were investigated by polysomnographic sleep EEG recordings under drug-free conditions and compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Sleep efficiency was significantly lower and wake % SPT was significantly increased in the patient group compared to healthy subjects. Sleep architecture did not differ among the two samples. Especially REM sleep measures, in particular, REM latency did not differ among the groups. No positive correlation was found between sleep variables and rating inventories for obsession and compulsions (Y-BOCS), depression (Hamilton) and anxiety (CAS). A secondary depression did not influence sleep EEG variables. The results of this study contradict the assumption that OCD patients show REM sleep and slow wave sleep abnormalities similar to those shown by patients with primary depression.

Key words

Obsessive and compulsive disorder Sleep EEG REM sleep 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fritz Hohagen
    • 1
  • Stephanie Lis
    • 1
  • Stephan Krieger
    • 1
  • Gaby Winkelmann
    • 1
  • Dieter Riemann
    • 1
  • Rosemarie Fritsch-Montero
    • 1
  • Eibe Rey
    • 2
  • Joseph Aldenhoff
    • 2
  • Mathias Berger
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychiatric DepartmentUniversity of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  2. 2.Central Institute of Mental HealthMannheimGermany

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