Noctural myoclonus syndrome (periodic movements in sleep) related to central dopamine D2-receptor alteration

  • J. Staedt
  • G. Stoppe
  • A. Kögler
  • H. Riemann
  • G. Hajak
  • D. L. Munz
  • D. Emrich
  • E. Rüther
Original Paper

Abstract

The nocturnal myoclonus syndrome (NMS) consists of stereotyped, repetitive jerks of the lower limbs that occur during sleep or wakefulness. NMS is often related with restless-legs syndrome (RLS) and can cause severe sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness. The efficacy of dopamine agonists in the treatment points to a dopaminergic dysfunction in NMS. We investigated the central dopamine D2-receptor occupancy with [123I] labeled (S)-2-hydroxy-3-iodo-6-methoxy-([1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl]methyl) benzamide (IBZM) (a highly selective CNS D2 dopamine receptor ligand) ([123I]IBZM) and single photon emission tomography (SPET) in 20 patients with NMS and in 10 healthy controls. In most of the patients with NMS there was a lower [123I]IBZM binding in the striatal structures compared to controls. The results indicate that NMS is related to a decrease of central D2-receptor occupancy.

Key words

Nocturnal myoclonus syndrome (NMS) Restless-legs syndrome (RLS) [123I]IBZM SPET Dopamine 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Akpinar S (1982) Treatment of restless-legs syndrome with levodopa plus benserazid. Arch Neurol 39:739Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ancoli-Israel S, Kripke DF, Klauber MR, Mason W, Fell R, Kaplan OJ (1991) Periodic limb movements in sleep in community dwelling elderly. Sleep 14:496–500Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bagetta G, DeSarro G, Priolo E, Nistico G (1988) Ventral tegmental area: site through which dopamine D2-receptor agonistslevoke behavioural and electrocortical sleep in rats. Br J Pharmacol 95:860–866Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Brodeur C, Montplaisir J, Goudbout R, Marinier R (1988) Treatment of restless-legs syndrome and periodic movements during sleep withl-dopa. Neurology 38:1845–1848Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Brücke T, Podreka I, Angelberger P, Wenger S, Topitz A, Kufferle B, Muller C, Deecke L (1991) Dopamine D2-receptor imaging with SPECT: Studies in different neuropsychiatric disorders. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 11:220–228Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hudson JI, Hudson MS, Pliner LF, Goldenberg DL, Pope HG (1985) Fibromyalgia and major effective disorder: a controlled phenomenology and family history study. Am J Psychiatry 142:441–446Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Innis RB, Malison RT, Al-Tikriti M, Hoffer PB, Sybirska EH, Seibyl JP, Zoghbi SS, Baldwin RM, Laruelle M, Smith EO, Charney DS, Heninger G, Elsworth JD, Roth RH (1992) Amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release competes in vivo for [123I]IBZM binding to the D2-receptor in nonhuman primates. Synapse 10:177–184Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Lugaresi E, Cirignotta F, Coccagna G, Montagna P (1986) Nocturnal myoclonus and restless-legs syndrome. In: Fahn S, Marsden CD, Van Woert MH (eds) Myoclonus. Raven Press, New York (Advances in Neurology, Vol 43), pp 295–307Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Montplaisir J, Godbout R, Boghen MD, deChamplain J, Young SN, Lappiere G (1985) Familial restless legs with periodic movements in sleep: Electrophysiologic, biochemical and pharmacologic study. Neurology 35:130–134Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Montplaisir J, Godbout R, Poirier G, Bedard MA (1986) Restless-legs syndrome and periodic movements in sleep: Physiopathology and treatment with L-dopa. Clin Neuropharmacol 9:456–463Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Rechtschaffen A, Kales A (1968) A manual of standardized terminology, techniques and scoring system for sleep stages of human subjects. Brain Information Service/Brain Research Institute, UCLA, Los AngelesGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Robertson MM (1990) Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome. Eur J Nucl Med 16:843–845Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Roth RH, Walters JR, Aghajanian GK (1973) Effect of impulse flow on release and synthesis of DA in the rat striatum. In: Usdin E, Synder SH (eds) Frontiers in catecholamine research. Pergamon, New York, pp 567–574Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Schwab RS and Zieper I (1965) Effects of mood, motivation, stress and alertness on the performance in Parkinson's disease. Psychiatr Neurol 150:345–357Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Staedt J, Stoppe G, Kögler A, Munz DL, Riemann H, Emrich D, Rüther E (1993) Dopamine D2-receptor alteration in patients with periodic movements in sleep (nocturmal myoclonus). J Neurol Transm Gen Sect 93:71–74Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Staedt J, Windt H, Hajak G, Stoppe G, Rudolph G, Ensink FMB, Hildebrandt J, Rüther E (1993) Cluster arousal analysis in chronic-pain-disturbed sleep. J Sleep Res 2:134–137Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Staedt J, Stoppe G, Kögler A, Munz DL, Hajak G, Staedt U, Riemann H, Rüther E (1994) Nächtliches Myoklonie-Syndrom (NMS) und Restless-Legs-Syndrom (RLS)-Übersicht und Fallbeschreibung. Fortschr Neurol Psychiatr 62:88–93Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Tatsch K, Schwarz J, Oertel WH, Kirsch CM (1991) SPECT imaging of dopamine D2-receptors with123I-IBZM:Initial experience in controls and patients with Parkinson's syndrome and Wilson's disease. Nucl Med Com 12:699–707Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Walters AS, Hennig WA, Kavey N, Chokroverty S, Gidro-Frank S (1988) A double-blind randomized crossover trial of bromocriptine and placebo in restless-legs syndrome. Ann Neurol 24:455–458Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Wong DF, Wagner Jr HN, Dannals RF, Links JM, Frost JJ, Ravert HT, Wilson AA, Rosenbaum AE, Gjedde A, Douglass KH, Petronis JD, Folstein MF, Toung JKT, Burns HD, Kuhar MJ (1984) Effects of age on dopamine and serotonin receptors measured by positron emission tomography in the living human brain. Science 226:1393–1396Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Staedt
    • 1
  • G. Stoppe
    • 1
  • A. Kögler
    • 2
  • H. Riemann
    • 1
  • G. Hajak
    • 1
  • D. L. Munz
    • 3
  • D. Emrich
    • 2
  • E. Rüther
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of GoettingenGoettingenGermany
  2. 2.Department of Nuclear MedicineGeorg August UniversityGottingenGermany
  3. 3.Department of Nuclear MedicineHumboldt University (Charité)BerlinGermany

Personalised recommendations