Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 248, Issue 2, pp 195–206 | Cite as

Molecular genetic analysis of theripening-inhibitor andnon-ripening loci of tomato: A first step in genetic map-based cloning of fruit ripening genes

  • James J. Giovannoni
  • Erick N. Noensie
  • Diane M. Ruezinsky
  • Xianghuai Lu
  • Samantha L. Tracy
  • Martin W. Ganal
  • Gregory B. Martin
  • Klaus Pillen
  • Kevin Albert
  • Steven D. Tankslev
Original Paper

Abstract

Ripening represents a complex developmental process unique to plants. We are using tomato fruit ripening mutants as tools to understand the regulatory components that control and coordinate the physiological and biochemical changes which collectively confer the ripe phenotype. We have genetically characterized two loci which result in significant inhibition of the ripening process in tomato,ripening-inhibitor (rin), andnon-ripening (nor), as a first step toward isolating genes likely to encode key regulators of this developmental process. A combination of pooled-sample mapping as well as classical restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis has permitted the construction of high-density genetic maps for the regions of chromosomes 5 and 10 spanning therin andnor loci, respectively. To assess the feasibility of initiating a chromosome walk, physical mapping of high molecular weight genomic DNA has been employed to estimate the relationship between physical distance (in kb) and genetic distance (in cM) around the targeted loci. Based on this analysis, the relationship in the region spanning therin locus is estimated to be 200–300 kb/cM, while thenor locus region ratio is approximately 200 kb/1 cM. Using RFLP markers tightly linked torin andnor, chromosome walks have been initiated to both loci in a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library of tomato genomic DNA. We have isolated and characterized several YAC clones linked to each of the targeted ripening loci and present genetic evidence that at least one YAC clone contains thenot locus.

Key words

Map-based cloning Pooled-sample mapping Physical mapping Tomato fruit ripening Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • James J. Giovannoni
    • 1
  • Erick N. Noensie
    • 1
  • Diane M. Ruezinsky
    • 1
  • Xianghuai Lu
    • 1
  • Samantha L. Tracy
    • 1
  • Martin W. Ganal
    • 2
  • Gregory B. Martin
    • 2
  • Klaus Pillen
    • 2
  • Kevin Albert
    • 2
  • Steven D. Tankslev
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Horticultural SciencesTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.Department of Plant Breeding and BiometryCornell UniversityIthacaNYUSA

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