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Self-disclosure in clinical social work

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Abstract

This article seeks to establish six guidelines for the use of selfdisclosure in clinical social work. It examines the relationship between self-disclosure and countertransference, the timing of self-disclosure over the course of the therapeutic relationship, types of self-disclosure, the connection between assessment of the client and self-disclosure, and how self-disclosure is related to reality-testing. Objections to self-disclosure are also examined and clinical examples are used throughout.

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Raines, J.C. Self-disclosure in clinical social work. Clin Soc Work J 24, 357–375 (1996). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02190743

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