Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 59–70 | Cite as

Varieties of narcissistically vulnerable couples: Dynamics and practice implications

  • Judith Nelsen
Articles

Abstract

This article discusses two types of narcissistically vulnerable couples not yet clearly delineated in the clinical literature. These are the narcissistic-overgiving couple and the borderline-codependent pair. While partners in each of these relationships share vulnerability to low self-esteem and abandonment fears, their defensive stategies are different and synergistic over time. Treatment approaches must respond to the partners' differences as well as to their mutual underlying concerns.

Keywords

Social Psychology Treatment Approach Clinical Literature Practice Implication Underlying Concern 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith Nelsen
    • 1
  1. 1.Chicago

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