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Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 9–19 | Cite as

The meeting of two narratives

  • Elinor A. Horner
Articles

Abstract

The post-modern paradigms, particularly regarding the nature of reality, are fast coloring our ideas regarding our client's truths. We now have an expanded understanding about the flexibility and dynamic nature of truth, and therefore of clients' narratives. Another narrative, however, that must be taken fully into account is the narrative of the therapist. In fact, what we have in a clinical hour is the meeting and blending of two narratives, that of the client and that of the therapist. This paper summarizes some of the recent thinking regarding narrative, and the nature of truth, as well as pointing to implications for clinical practice.

Keywords

Clinical Practice Social Psychology Dynamic Nature Recent Thinking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elinor A. Horner
    • 1
  1. 1.South Shore Mental Health CenterQuincy

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