Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 149–163

Freud's “Anna O.”: Social work's Bertha Pappenheim

  • Carol R. Swenson
Articles

Abstract

The story of “Anna O.” has loomed large in psychoanalytic history, but few social workers know that the young woman, who was so influential in the development of Freud's thinking, became a pioneer social worker in Germany. The story of the transformation of the troubled young woman, who was actually Joseph Breuer's patient, is the focus of this paper. In addition, some of the “facts” of the case are discussed as social constructions. Anna O./ Bertha Pappenheim participated in the creation of the “talking cure” and eventually went on to be a leading feminist, developer of social programs for women, and social reformer.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Andersen, T. (1987). The reflecting team: Dialogue and meta-dialogue in clinical work.Family Process, 26, 415–428.Google Scholar
  2. Anderson, H. and Goolishian, H. (1988). Human systems as linguistic systems: Preliminary and evolving ideas about the implications for clinical theory.Family Process, 27 (4), 371–394.Google Scholar
  3. Benhabib, S. and Cornell, D. (1987).Feminism as critique. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota.Google Scholar
  4. Breuer, J. (1895/1953–74). Fraulein Anna O. InThe complete works of Sigmund Freud, standard edition, Vol. II, pp. 21–47. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  5. Cohler, B. (1988). The human studies and the life history.Social Service Review, 62, 552–575.Google Scholar
  6. Edinger, D. (1968).Bertha Pappenheim: Freud's Anna O. Highland Park, Ill.: Congregation Solel.Google Scholar
  7. Ellenberger, H. (1972). The story of “Anna O.”: A critical review with new data.Journal of the History of Behavioral Science, 8, 267–279.Google Scholar
  8. Ellenberger, H. (1970).The discovery of the unconscious. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  9. Freeman, L. (1972).The story of Anna O. New York: Walker and Co.Google Scholar
  10. Freud, S. (1988).My three mothers and other passions. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Freund, E. (Ed.), (1950).Letters of Sigmund Freud, New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  12. Gay, P. (1988)Freud: A life for our times, pp. 63–69. New York, Norton.Google Scholar
  13. Germain, C. (1979).Social work practice: People and environments, pp. 1–22. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Germain, C. and Gitterman, A. (1980).The life model of social work practice. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Gilligan, C. (1982).In a different voice. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Goldberg, A. (1987) Psychoanalysis and negotiation.Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 56, 109–129.Google Scholar
  17. Greenson, R. (1967)The technique and practice of psychoanalysis. N.Y.: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  18. Hoffman, L. (1989). Naturalizing family therapy. Unpubished lecture Boston University School of Social Work.Google Scholar
  19. Hoffman, L. (1981)Foundation of family therapy New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  20. Hunter, D. (1985). Hysteria, psychoanalysis, and feminism: The case of Anna O. InThe mother tongue: Essays in feminist psychoanalytic interpretation, S. Garner, C. Kahane, and M. Sprengnether, (Eds.), pp 89–115, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Jackowitz, A. H. (1984) Anna O./Bertha Pappenheim and me. InBetween women, C. Ascher, L. Desalvo, and S. Ruddick (Eds.), pp. 254–273. Boston: Beacon Press.Google Scholar
  22. Jones, E. (1953)The life and work of Sigmund Freud, Vol. 1, pp. 223–226. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  23. Kaplan, M. (1984) Anna O. and Bertha Pappenheim: An historical perspective. InAnna O: Fourteen contemporary reinterpretations, M. Rosenbaum and M. Muroff (Eds.), pp. 101–117. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  24. Keeney, B. (1983).Aesthetics of change. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  25. Kegan, R. (1982).The evolving self. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  26. Laird, J. (1988). Women and stories: Restorying women's self-constructions. In M. McGoldrick, F. Walsh, and C. Anderson (Eds.),Women in families. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  27. Lee, J. and Swenson, C. (1986). The concept of mutual aid. In L. Shulman and A. Gitterman (Eds.),Mutual aid and the life cycle, pp. 361–380. Itaska. IL: Peacock Press.Google Scholar
  28. Loewenstein, S. (1979). Inner and outer space in social casework.Social Casework, 60 (1), 19–29.Google Scholar
  29. Maluccio, A. (1980).Learning from clients. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  30. Newgarten, B. (1977). Continuities and discontinuities of psychological issues into adult life.Human Development, 12, 121–30.Google Scholar
  31. Oxley, G. B. (1971). A life-model approach to change.Social Casework, 52, 627–633.Google Scholar
  32. Parry, A. (1991). A universe of stories.Family Process, 30, 37–54.Google Scholar
  33. Polkinghorne, D. (1988).Narrative knowing and the human sciences. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
  34. Pollock, G. H. (1972). Bertha Pappenheims's pathological mourning: Possible effects of childhood sibling loss.Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 20 (3), 476–493.Google Scholar
  35. Pollock, G. H. (1973). Bertha Pappenheim: Addenda to her case history.Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 21 (2), 328–332.Google Scholar
  36. Pollock, G. H. (1984), Anna O: Insight, hindsight, and foresight InAnna O: Fourteen contemporary reinterpretations, M. Rosenbaum and M. Muroff (Eds.), pp. 26–33. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  37. Ricoeur, P. (1970).Freud and philosophy: An essay on interpretation. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  38. Ricoeur, P. (1981).Hermeneutics and the social sciences, (Ed. and trans. by J. Thompson). Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  39. Rosenbaum, M. (1984). Anna O. (Bertha Pappenheim): Her history. In Rosenbaum, M., and Muroff, M. (Eds.). (1984).Anna O.: Fourteen contemporary reinterpretations. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  40. Rosenbaum, M., and Muroff, M., (Eds.) (1984).Anna O.: Fourteen contemporary reinterpretations. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  41. Saari, C. (1988). Interpretation: Event or process?Clinical Social Work Journal, 16 (4), 378–390.Google Scholar
  42. Spence, D. (1986). When interpretation masquerades as explanation.Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 34, 3–22.Google Scholar
  43. Spence, D. (1982).Narrative truth and historical truth. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  44. Spotnitz, H. (1984), The case of Anna O.: Aggression and the narcissistic countertransference. InAnna O: Fourteen contemporary reinterpretations, M. Rosenbaum and M. Muroff (Eds.), pp. 132–140. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  45. Sprengnether, M. (1985). Enforcing Oedipus: Freud and Dora. In S. N. Garner, C. Kahan, and M. Sprengnether,The (m)other tongue: Essays in feminist psychoanalytic interpretation, pp. 51–71 Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  46. Steinmann, A. (1984) Anna O.: Female, 1880–1882; Bertha Pappenheim: Female, 1980–1982. InAnna O: Fourteen contemporary reinterpretations, M. Rosenbaum and M. Muroff (Eds.), pp. 118–131. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  47. Stern, D. (1985)The interpersonal world of the infant. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol R. Swenson
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social WorkSimmons CollegeBoston

Personalised recommendations