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Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 397–415 | Cite as

“In hunger I am king”—Understanding anorexia nervosa from a psychoanalytic perspective: Theoretical and clinical implications

  • Lynda Chassler
Articles

Abstract

“In hunger I am king” (Kazantzakis, 1963) expresses the inner struggle of the anorectic. In the relentless pursuit of thinness, anorexia nervosa is a desperate search for autonomy and a self-respecting identity.

The syndrome is a serious emotional disturbance causing mental, emotional, and physical deterioration. Medical complications, such as cardiac arrest, can be fatal.

After addressing the development of anorexia as a clinical entity, the anorexia nervosa syndrome is examined from the divergent psychoanalytic theories and treatment philosophies of Freud's Drive-Conflict Model, Ego Psychology, Interpersonal Theory, Object Relations Theory, Self Psychology, and Attachment Theory. Case material is presented to highlight the different psychoanalytic formulations.

Keywords

Social Psychology Cardiac Arrest Anorexia Nervosa Clinical Implication Clinical Entity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lynda Chassler
    • 1
  1. 1.Beverly Hills

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