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Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 24, Issue 1, pp 21–34 | Cite as

Through a glass darkly: Chronic illness in the therapist

  • Claudia M. Elliott
Articles

Abstract

This paper is about doing psychotherapy while suffering from a chronic illness. The purpose is to describe the manner in which ongoing irreversible pain integrates itself into the life of any human being, but specifically that of the therapist. The process of weaving the experience into the life narrative and in turn the therapeutic narrative is explored.

Key Words

illness therapist analyst narrative chronic 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claudia M. Elliott
    • 1
  1. 1.Private PracticeChicago

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