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Plant and Soil

, Volume 82, Issue 3, pp 329–335 | Cite as

Developing a breeding strategy to exploit quantitative variation in symbiotic nitrogen fixation

  • L. R. Mytton
Article

Summary

This paper examines evidence which quantifies the relative importance of legume and Rhizobium genotypes as determinants of phenotypic variation in symbiotic nitrogen fixation. It demonstrates potentially large and unpredictable effects of the Rhizobium genotype. The likely importance of such effects on crop yield is considered. The information is then used to assess ways in which legume breeding programmes may be altered to encompass the effects of genetic variation in Rhizobium.

Key words

Legume breeding Medicago sativa Nitrogen fixation Rhizobium Trifolium repens Vicia faba 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff/Dr W. Junk Publishers 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. R. Mytton
    • 1
  1. 1.Welsh Plant Breeding StationAberystwythUK

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