Effects of water regime on growth, yield, and nitrogen uptake of rice

Summary

The effects of water regime on the performance of rice were investigated in a greenhouse experiment and two field experiments. The greenhouse experiment involved four water regimes (continuous flooding, and soil drying for 16 days — begun 2, 5, and 8 weeks after transplanting — followed by reflooding), four soils, and 0 and 100 mg N/kg. Soil drying raised the redox potentials of all soils beyond the aerobic threshold. Averaged for soils and N levels, yields from treatments in which soil drying was begun at 2 and 5 weeks after transplanting were lower than that from the continuously flooded treatment, but the simple effects of soil drying on yield and N uptake depended on the soil and the growth stage of the plant. None of the soil-drying treatments had adverse effects in the soil high in N but soil drying at 2 and 5 weeks after transplanting had adverse effects in the soil low in N. The field experiments tested the effects of three water regimes (continuous flooding, alternate drying and flooding every 2 weeks, and soil drying for 2 weeks at 6 weeks after transplanting following by reflooding), and 0, 50, 100, and 150 kg N/ha on a nearly neutral clay soil, during two seasons. None of the soil-drying treatments depressed growth, yield, or N uptake by rice at any level of N in either season. Nitrate was absent after drying, so denitrification was not possible on subsequent flooding. The adverse effects on yield of alternate flooding and drying, attributed to nitrification-denitrification, may be insignificant in wetland fields carrying an actively growing rice crop.

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Khind, C.S., Ponnamperuma, F.N. Effects of water regime on growth, yield, and nitrogen uptake of rice. Plant Soil 59, 287–298 (1981). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02184201

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Key Words

  • Denitrification
  • Nitrogen fertilization uptake losses
  • Redox potential
  • Water regime
  • Wetland rice