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Plant and Soil

, Volume 89, Issue 1–3, pp 351–369 | Cite as

The present situation and problems of mariculture in Japan

  • T. Watanabe
Mariculture
  • 83 Downloads

Summary

Recently, rearing techniques for various kinds of fish have advanced markedly, and the number of fish species in commercial production increases every year. The establishment of methods for stable, reproducible mass culture of live foods that are highly nutritious is still necessary to improve the survival and growth rates of larval fish. Since, however, the mass propagation of live foods requires costly equipment and depends upon weather conditions, the development of artificial larval diets to replace live foods will be essential. In mariculture local trash fish are commonly used as a feed for juvenile fish because of their low cost and high acceptability to the cultured fish. However, this frequently results in deterioration of water environments, leading to the appearance of fish diseases and pollution. The development of artificial diets such as moist pellets will also improve these conditions.

Mass-cultured fish seed are mainly used for the culture of commercial-sized fish, even though they are generally poorer in taste than wild fish. They are also used for release into coastal waters to promote inshore fishery, but it is difficult to evaluate the effect of stocking on the total catch. Another type of mariculture depends upon raising wild juveniles, though there are clearly too few caught to supply enough fish seed to satisfy the ever-growing demands of fish breeders. Thus, the cultivation of broodstock to produce high-quality eggs is important.

Key words

Artemia Broodstock Essential fatty acids Flounder Live food Mariculture Red sea bream Rotifers Self-pollution Yellowtail 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Watanabe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AquacultureTokyo University of FisheriesTokyoJapan

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