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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 24, Issue 5, pp 587–601 | Cite as

Affective disorders in people with autism: A review of published cases

  • Janet E. Lainhart
  • Susan E. Folstein
Article

Abstract

The presentation of affective disorders in people with autism and autistic-like disorders is discussed based upon a review of 17 published cases. Half of the patients were female and almost all of the patients had IQs in the mentally retarded range. 35% of the patients had the onset of affective disorder in childhood. Of the cases mentioning family history, 50% had a family history of affective disorder or suicide. Changes in mood, self-attitude, and vital sense were rarely reported by the patients. A change in mood, attitude toward self and others, and vegetative changes were inferred based on the observations of others. Difficulties in diagnosing affective disorders in autistic people are presented and suggestions are made for diagnosis, treatment, and research.

Keywords

Family History School Psychology Affective Disorder Vegetative Change Autistic People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janet E. Lainhart
    • 1
  • Susan E. Folstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Meyer 2-181The Johns Hopkins HospitalBaltimore

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