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Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 22, Issue 5, pp 517–529 | Cite as

Effects of experimenter and mother presence on the attentional performance and activity of hyperactive boys

  • Rapson Gomez
  • Ann V. Sanson
Article

Abstract

The attentional performance, activity, and off-task behavior of hyperactive boys with and without conduct problems and normal boys were compared on a cancellation task under three conditions: when performing the task alone, with mother present, and with experimenter present. Results indicated that both the hyperactive groups achieved poorer attentional scores than normal subjects in the alone and mother present conditions, but improved in the experimenter present condition. The performance of the hyperactive boys with conduct problems was particularly affected by this condition. The activity and off-task behavior scores of both the hyperactive groups were higher than controls in all conditions, although the hyperactive boys with conduct problems decreased in off-task behavior when the experimenter was present. Attention and behavior scores were not significantly correlated. The implications of these findings for assessment of hyperactivity, and the role of noncompliance in the attentional behavior of hyperactive children, are discussed.

Keywords

Conduct Problem Present Condition School Psychology Attentional Performance Behavior Score 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rapson Gomez
    • 1
  • Ann V. Sanson
    • 2
  1. 1.School of PsychologyUniversity of BallaratBallaratAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Psychology, School of Behavioural SciencesUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

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