Neurophysiology

, Volume 20, Issue 5, pp 423–432 | Cite as

Mathematical model of activity of spinal generators producing rhythmic movement

  • A. M. Degtyarenko
Article
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Abstract

Different organizational arrangements of scratching and locomotor rhythm generators were simulated by a computer-aided mathematical model. A functional group of neurons (a hemicenter constructed on the basis of a stochastically arranged neuronal network) served as the basis for the generator. Several organizational arrangements of scratching and locomotor rhythm generators are considered: two hemicenters with reciprocal inhibitory connections and tonic excitatory influences on both; two hemicenters with inhibitory-excitatory connections and tonic excitatory influences on only one of these; circular structures consisting of more than two functional groups of neurons with excitatory and inhibitory connections between them. All these arrangements would allow for generation of rhythmic activity with a similar time course to that of scratching and locomotor rhythm. It was found that the transition from locomotor to scratching rhythm could be based on fairly simply organized effects on generator neurons. Principles possibly guiding the construction of spinal generators of scratching and locomotor movements are discussed.

Keywords

Mathematical Model Neuronal Network Similar Time Rhythmic Activity Rhythmic Movement 

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© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1989

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  • A. M. Degtyarenko

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