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Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 107–116 | Cite as

Verbal giftedness and sociopolitical intelligence: Terman revisited

  • Robert Hogan
  • Mary Cowan Viernstein
  • Peter V. McGinn
  • Wayne Bohannon
  • Stephen P. Daurio
Article

Abstract

This paper reports on a three-year study of sociopolitical intelligence-defined as the ability to formulate viable solutions to moral, social, and political problems—in adolescence. From an initial sample of 659 intellectually gifted 12- and 13-year-olds, 58 students with the highest SAT-V scores were selected for study. From a later sample of 506 equally gifted 13- and 14-year-olds, 120 students were selected using measures of verbal intelligence (DAT), social insight, and creative potential, as well as academic and nonacademic achievement. On the basis of a variety of personality and cognitive measures the students in both samples were found to be unusually mature and well adjusted but to vary considerably in sociopolitical intelligence. These results suggest in partial agreement with Terman's earlier findings concerning the gifted, that above a certain level of tested intelligence the critical determinants of effective, practical performance may be personality and biographical variables.

Keywords

Health Psychology School Psychology Initial Sample Critical Determinant Cognitive Measure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corp 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Hogan
    • 1
  • Mary Cowan Viernstein
    • 1
    • 2
  • Peter V. McGinn
  • Wayne Bohannon
  • Stephen P. Daurio
  1. 1.The Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimore
  2. 2.The University of Vermont Medical SchoolBurlington

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