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Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 229–247 | Cite as

Measurement of the psychological well-being of adolescents: The psychometric properties and assessment procedures of the how I feel

  • Anne C. Petersen
  • Sheppard G. Kellam
Article

Abstract

The assessment procedures and psychometric properties of the How I Feel (HIF), an instrument used to assess psychological well-being in a population of Black adolescents are described. The audiovisual mode of presentation obviates problems related to reading skill; in addition, it standardizes the administration of the instrument. The How I Feel appears to measure reliably and validly several multi-item constructs representing psychological well-being. These constructs relate to other instruments and constructs in meaningful and interesting ways. A major result of our validity studies is that there appear to be two major components of psychological well-being, psychopathology and self-esteem.

Keywords

Health Psychology Psychometric Property Validity Study School Psychology Reading Skill 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corp 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne C. Petersen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sheppard G. Kellam
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory for the Study of AdolescenceMichael Reese Hospital and Medical CenterChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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