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Annals of Vascular Surgery

, Volume 8, Issue 4, pp 356–362 | Cite as

Prospective, multicenter study of managing lower extremity venous ulcers

  • Thomas E. Arnold
  • James C. Stanley
  • Elaine P. Fellows
  • Georgia A. Moncada
  • Roger Allen
  • Jerry J. Hutchinson
  • William M. Swartz
  • Laura L. Bolton
  • C. F. H. Vickers
  • Morris D. Kerstein
Original Articles

Abstract

Seventy patients with 90 venous ulcers were randomly assigned to hydrocolloid or conventional dressing and compression therapy at four study centers. The ulcers had been present for a mean of 47.8 in the control and 46.2 weeks in the treatment group and 42% of all patients had recurrent ulcers. Ulcers treated with hydrocolloid dressings reduced 71% and control treated wounds reduced 43% in area after 7.2 weeks of treatment. Thirty-four percent of all ulcers healed. Mean time to healing was 7 weeks for the hydrocolloid dressing group and 8 weeks for the control group. Most ulcers were less painful at final evaluation, but reduction in pain was more pronounced in hydrocolloid-dressed ulcers (p=0.03). At baseline as well as during follow-up, significant differences between study centers were observed. Ulcers in patients in the United Kingdom were larger and less likely to heal (p=0.001). Size of the ulcer at baseline was associated with treatment response and time to healing (p=0.002). Percent reduction in ulcer area after 2 weeks was also correlated with treatment outcome (p=0.004) and time to healing (p=0.002). When all treatment outcome predictors were analyzed together, only percent reduction in area after 2 weeks remained statistically significant (p=0.002), with percent reduction during the first 2 weeks of treatment >30% predicting healing.

Keywords

Public Health Treatment Group Abdominal Surgery Treatment Outcome Lower Extremity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas E. Arnold
    • 1
  • James C. Stanley
    • 2
  • Elaine P. Fellows
    • 2
  • Georgia A. Moncada
    • 3
  • Roger Allen
    • 5
  • Jerry J. Hutchinson
    • 6
  • William M. Swartz
    • 3
  • Laura L. Bolton
    • 4
  • C. F. H. Vickers
    • 7
  • Morris D. Kerstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryHahnemann University Medicine SchoolPhiladelphia
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryUniversity of Michigan HospitalAnn Arbor
  3. 3.Department of SurgeryShadyside HospitalPittsburgh
  4. 4.A Division of Bristol-Myers SquibbConvaTecSkillman
  5. 5.Queens Medical CentreNottinghamUK
  6. 6.Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceuticals Ltd.HounslowUK
  7. 7.Royal Liverpool HospitalLiverpoolUK

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