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Transportation

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 251–262 | Cite as

Driver information systems — A North American perspective

  • Kan Chen
Article

Abstract

Driver information systems (DIS) are considered in North America as a major category of Intelligent Vehicle-Highway Systems (IVHS), which offers to improve the efficiency and safety of driving by means of an amalgamation of information technology with vehicle and highway technologies. Traditionally North America has basic strengths in a number of information technologies that are relevant to DIS. Due to a hiatus in federal funding in the early 1980s, DIS development in North America during the past decade has emphasized autonomous systems on the vehicles until recently. The current acceleration of IVHS development in the United States has resulted from a number of converging forces and has provided the impetus for developing advanced driver information systems (ADIS) that integrates the vehicle and the highway. Large-scale demonstration and implementation of ADIS will hinge on the major legislations in the near future, and on the successful development of public-private sector partnerships in IVHS.

Key words

Intelligent Vehicle-Highway Systems route guidance automobile navigation automatic vehicle identification 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kan Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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