Annals of Operations Research

, Volume 63, Issue 3, pp 337–370

Genetic algorithms for the traveling salesman problem

  • Jean-Yves Potvin
Genetic Algorithms

Abstract

This paper is a survey of genetic algorithms for the traveling salesman problem. Genetic algorithms are randomized search techniques that simulate some of the processes observed in natural evolution. In this paper, a simple genetic algorithm is introduced, and various extensions are presented to solve the traveling salesman problem. Computational results are also reported for both random and classical problems taken from the operations research literature.

Keywords

Traveling salesman problem genetic algorithms stochastic search 

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Copyright information

© J.C. Baltzer AG, Science Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean-Yves Potvin
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre de Recherche sur les TransportsUniversité de MontréalMontréalCanada

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