Heat and salt balances in the Seto Inland Sea

  • Mayumi Murakami
  • Yukio Oonishi
  • Hideaki Kunishi
Article

Abstract

Seasonal variations of heat and salt balances are estimated in the Seto Inland Sea with the use of a numerical experiment.

The surface effect is dominant with respect to the heat balance. In spring, however, the effect of the horizontal heat transport is the same as or greater than that of the surface heating (or cooling). Annual mean heat transport is 85 cal cm−2 day−1 (356 J cm−2 day−1) which is supplied from the open ocean and lost through the sea surface in the Inland Sea as a whole. Because of the shallow water depth, heat is supplied through the surface and carried out by the horizontal heat transport in Hiuchi- and Bingo-nada in the annual mean. The heat transport has the opposite sense to that in the whole Seto Inland Sea and annual mean transport is negative (−10 cal cm−2 day−1,i.e., −42 J cm−2 day−1).

The salt balance is primarily controlled by the river discharge and the surface effect (precipitation) in June and July. In the other months, the effects of horizontal salt transport, of river inflow and of sea surface exchange (especially of the evaporation in autumn) are comparable to each other. In the Bungo Channel the river effect is relatively small. Osaka Bay and the Kii Channel are characterized by a smaller surface effect.

Keywords

Water Depth Heat Transport River Discharge Surface Heating Salt Balance 

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Copyright information

© the Oceanographical Society of Japan 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mayumi Murakami
    • 1
  • Yukio Oonishi
    • 2
  • Hideaki Kunishi
    • 3
  1. 1.Tohoku Regional Fisheries Research LaboratoryShiogamaJapan
  2. 2.Lake Biwa Research InstituteOotsuJapan
  3. 3.Hiroshima Institute of TechnologyHiroshimaJapan

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