Medical Microbiology and Immunology

, Volume 161, Issue 3, pp 175–188 | Cite as

Modification of normal cell surface by smooth membrane preparations from BHK-21 cells infected with Newcastle disease virus

  • Yoshiyuki Nagai
  • Tetsuya Yoshida
  • Saiji Yoshii
  • Koichiro Maeno
  • Toshisada Matsumoto
Article

Abstract

Smooth membrane fractions were prepared from the cytoplasmic extract of BHK-21 cells infected with Newcastle disease virus (NDV). These membranes exhibited high hemagglutinating, neuraminidase, and hemolytic activity but little infectivity, suggesting that they might be precursors for viral envelope. When such membranes were adsorbed to the monolayers of uninfected BHK-21 cells at 4‡C and then incubated at elevated temperature for a couple of hours, the cells became highly hemadsorptive even in the presence of cycloheximide. This phenomenon occurred between 15‡C and 25‡C, and was maximal at 31‡C, where approximately 4 times more erythrocytes were adsorbed than to the cells incubated at 4‡C. Immunofluorescent staining suggested that diffusion of viral antigens might occurred rapidly over the entire surface of the cells.

Cell fractions containing virions induced hemadsorption in uninfected cells, too. However, induction occurred now at 31‡C and was maximal at 37‡C, and erythrocytes appeared to be adsorbed not to the entire surface of the monolayer but restricted areas of the cells. The diffusion of viral antigens on the cell surface was not so significant under these conditions.

On the basis of these findings the possible role of the membranes of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum in virus replication is discussed.

Keywords

Virus Replication Immunofluorescent Staining Membrane Fraction Cycloheximide Cell Fraction 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshiyuki Nagai
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tetsuya Yoshida
    • 1
  • Saiji Yoshii
    • 1
  • Koichiro Maeno
    • 1
  • Toshisada Matsumoto
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Virology, Cancer Research InstituteNagoya University School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Institut für VirologieJustus-Liebig-UniversitätGießenGermany

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