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Influence of the incubation atmosphere on the production of slime byStaphylococcus epidermidis

  • C. Pérez-Giraldo
  • A. Rodríguez-Benito
  • F. J. Morán
  • C. Hurtado
  • M. T. Blanco
  • A. C. Gómez-García
Notes

Abstract

The influence of various incubation atmospheres on the growth and slime production of 23Staphylococcus epidermidis strains was studied. The atmospheres evaluated were aerobiosis (control), anaerobiosis, candle jar, 5 % CO2 and 10 % CO2. As compared to the aerobic control, growth was 55.7 ± 19 % (p<0.01) in anaerobic incubation, 113.7 ± 12 % (p<0.01) in 5 % CO2, 112.8 ± 13 % (p<0.01) in 10 % CO2 and 106.4 ± 7 % (p>0.1) in the candle jar. The slime production in relation to the aerobic control was 20.3 ± 19 % in anaerobiosis (p<0.01), 22.3 ± 27 % (p<0.01) in 5 % CO2, 29.4 ± 39 % (p<0.01) in 10 % CO2 and 68.3 ± 26 % (p>0.1) in the candle jar. The results of this study may explain the discrepancies which have been noted on occasion between slime formation data and pathogenicity.

Keywords

Internal Medicine Formation Data Anaerobic Incubation Slime Production Incubation Atmosphere 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Pérez-Giraldo
    • 1
  • A. Rodríguez-Benito
    • 1
  • F. J. Morán
    • 1
  • C. Hurtado
    • 1
  • M. T. Blanco
    • 1
  • A. C. Gómez-García
    • 1
  1. 1.Microbiology Department, Faculty of MedicineExtremadura UniversityBadajozSpain

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