Journal of Behavioral Education

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 67–87 | Cite as

An analysis of the relationship of teachers' reported use of classroom management strategies on types of classroom interactions

  • Susan L. Jack
  • Richard E. Shores
  • R. Kenton Denny
  • Philip L. Gunter
  • Terry DeBriere
  • Paris DePaepe
Regular Papers

Abstract

The results of an investigation to determine teachers' reported use of classroom management strategies and their relationship to teacher and student interactions are presented. We interviewed 20 teachers to determine how they developed and used classroom management strategies, and then observed the interactions of these teachers with children with serious behavior disorders (SBD). Results identified two groups of teachers: one that scored high on planned use of the strategies, and one that scored low. Comparisons between the two groups of the interaction patterns revealed small, but statistically significant differences in the mean length and total percent time involved in positive interactions. The group reporting higher use of the management strategies engaged in positive interactions which were longer in duration than the interactions of the group reporting lower use. The results are discussed in terms of further research needs and implications for teacher training programs.

Key words

teacher and student interactions classroom management strategies children with serious behavior disorders 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan L. Jack
    • 3
  • Richard E. Shores
    • 3
  • R. Kenton Denny
    • 1
  • Philip L. Gunter
    • 2
  • Terry DeBriere
    • 3
  • Paris DePaepe
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Curriculum & InstructionLouisiana State UniversityBaton Rouge
  2. 2.Department of Special EducationValdosta State UniversityValdosta
  3. 3.Life Span InstituteKansas University Affiliated ProgramParsons

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