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Journal of Gambling Studies

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 129–145 | Cite as

Antisocial personality disorder and pathological gambling

  • Alex P. Blaszczynski
  • Neil McConaghy
Articles

Abstract

The prevalence of antisocial personality disorder and its relationship to criminal offenses in pathological gamblers was investigated. A semi-structured interview schedule containing DSM-III criteria for antisocial personality and the California Psychological Inventory Socialisation subscale was administered to a sample of 306 pathological gamblers. Of the total sample, 35% reported no offense. Forty eight percent admitted to the commission of a gambling related offense, 6% to a non-gambling related offense, and 11% to both types of offense. Fifteen percent of subjects met DSM-III diagnostic criteria for antisocial personality disorder. Though these subjects were at greatest risk for committing criminal offenses, offenses were committed independently of DSM-III antisocial personality disorder in the majority of gamblers. It was concluded that features of antisocial personality emerged in response to repeated attempts to conceal excessive gambling and gambling induced financial difficulties.

Keywords

Great Risk Total Sample Personality Disorder Pathological Gambler Financial Difficulty 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alex P. Blaszczynski
    • 1
  • Neil McConaghy
    • 2
  1. 1.University of New South WalesLiverpoolAustralia
  2. 2.University of New South WalesKensingtonAustralia

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