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Observations on some bathypelagic copepods living in British Columbia mainland inlets

  • Peter A. Koeller
Article

Abstract

Isolated populations of three bathypelagic copepods,Spinocalanus brevicaudatus, Scaphocalanus brevicornis andHeterorhabdus tanneri are shown to exist in the deeper inlets of the British Columbia mainland coast. The three species probably breed throughout the year. The possible significance of some observed migration patterns is discussed. It is shown that useful biological information on bathypelagic organisms can be obtained from relatively accessible and highly productive coastal fjords.

Keywords

Migration Migration Pattern Biological Information Mainland Coast Coastal Fjord 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Oceanographical Society of Japan 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter A. Koeller
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of OceanographyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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