Group

, Volume 20, Issue 4, pp 287–302 | Cite as

Treating work inhibition in group psychotherapy

  • Jeffrey L. Kleinberg
Article
  • 38 Downloads

Abstract

Work Inhibition, defined as an impaired ability to pursue one's career goals, may be treated by combined individual and group therapy. The author presents a method for assessing the degree of work difficulty, a psychodynamic understanding of the problem, and an approach to treatment. He proposes that helping the patient work more actively in group will generalize to the workplace and reduce inhibition. A clinical illustration is provided.

Key words

work inhibition psychodynamic group therapy 

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Copyright information

© Eastern Group Psychotherapy Society 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey L. Kleinberg
    • 1
  1. 1.La Guardia Community CollegeCity University of New YorkLong Island City

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