Using needs surveys to foster consumer and family empowerment

  • Harvey J. Lieberman
  • Joanne Forbes
  • Thomas Uttaro
  • Lucy Sarkis
Reports

Conclusions

This survey involved SBPC, its consumers, and their families in a shared task and work experience which had a direct useful purpose: the planning of the next phase in their collaboration. In this way, the survey, itself, was a vehicle for further cementing the collaborative relationship and was consistent with previous suggestions about promoting consumer and family participation (Church, 1989). Future agency efforts seeking to measure differences in priorities untapped by this survey will involve specific services and situations, such as preference in housing or medication (Uttaro & Mechanic, 1994). Having built the collaboration essential to this work, more complex surveys with refined research selection procedures will be implemented.

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References

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harvey J. Lieberman
    • 1
  • Joanne Forbes
    • 1
  • Thomas Uttaro
    • 1
  • Lucy Sarkis
    • 1
  1. 1.Treatment ServicesSouth Beach Psychiatric CenterStaten Island

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