Families' perceptions of psychiatric hospitalization of relatives with a severe mental illness

  • James G. Hanson
Articles

Abstract

This paper reports the experience with psychiatric inpatient care of families with mentally ill relatives. Most families report great dissatisfaction with their involvement with the staff and treatment at psychiatric hospitals. Recommended methods of reducing the family burden and improving a productive alliance are engaging the family at admission, inclusion in the treatment process, family education, proactive engagement and training which addresses the family perspective.

Keywords

Public Health Mental Illness Treatment Process Psychiatric Hospital Inpatient Care 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • James G. Hanson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Social Work at the University of Northern IowaCedar Falls

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