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Blood serotonin in psychotic and brain damaged children

  • Magda Campbell
  • Eitan Friedman
  • Estelle DeVito
  • Leon Greenspan
  • Patrick J. Collins
Articles

Abstract

In this preliminary study blood scrotonin levels were measured in 11 severely disturbed children (9 boys and 2 girls) and 6 controls, matched for age, sex and verbal IQ. Tendency toward higher serotonin levels in patients was noted. However, the difference between patients and controls was not statistically significant. Low intellectual functioning was the only parameter which seemed to be clearly associated with higher serotonin levels.

Keywords

Serotonin School Psychology Brain Damage Serotonin Level Intellectual Functioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© V. H. Winston & Sons, Inc. 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Magda Campbell
    • 1
  • Eitan Friedman
    • 1
  • Estelle DeVito
    • 1
  • Leon Greenspan
    • 1
  • Patrick J. Collins
    • 1
  1. 1.New York University Medical CenterNew York

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